A Study in Exodus

Exodus Chapter 38

This chapter continues the construction. The construction of Altar of Burnt Offering, the Laver, and other materials of the Tabernacle are discussed.

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Exodus Chapter 37

This chapter is going to tell us about the construction of the Ark, the golden lampstand, and the altar of incense.

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Exodus Chapter 36

Bezalel and Oholiab were apparently in charge of the skilled craftsmen who performed the construction.
This chapter is mostly a repetition of the previous commands given. The previous commands started with the holiest of the objects, starting with the Ark of the Covenant, and working outward. But here the construction of the Tabernacle itself and then continues with the furnishings. It is very practical. First build the house, then you have a place to put the furnishings as you construct them.

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Exodus Chapter 35

Since the convenant has been re-instituted, the Tabernacle may now be built. The instructions were given in earlier chapters, but the construction had not yet taken place.

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Exodus Chapter 34

What is going to take place in this chapter is a reinstatement of the covenant broken by Israel. The shattered tablets, which once testified to the reality of the covenant between Elohim and Israel, were to be reproduced.

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Exodus Chapter 33

The words of Moses were given to him in the most direct manner possible. This makes the words of Moses weightier than those of any other prophet.
Yeshua Himself said that the Words of Moses are the most important and convincing of all (Luke 16:31). To deny Torah is to deny the most direct Words and Instructions of Elohim.

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Exodus Chapter 32

After just a few days of waiting, the people grew impatient. They gave Moses up for dead and decided that Elohim doesn’t care anymore. They wanted to make their own gods and go back to Egypt.

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Exodus Chapter 31

The two tablets of stone were written by the finger of Elohim. That gives the covenant with Israel His personal signature.

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Exodus Chapter 30

The whole tabernacle speaks of Messiah and the relationship we can have through Him when we submit ourselves to Him as our Master.

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Exodus Chapter 29

The application of the blood to the ear, hands, and feet speak of the priest hearing Torah (ear), works reflecting Torah (hand), and walks according to Torah (foot). His manner of life, was to be consecrated to Elohim. Even his clothing was sprinkled with the blood of sacrifice and consecration

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Exodus Chapter 28

What is the Urim and the Thummim? Most scholars say the words stand for “lights and perfections” (or “true instruction”). They were kept in the breastplate and apparently Elohim used them to give the High Priest “yes” or “no” answers.

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Exodus Chapter 27

A wall of curtains set apart the tabernacle from the rest of the camp. This signifies the separation of man from Elohim due to his sin.

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Exodus Chapter 26

The veil was the only entrance, or door into the Holy Place. This was the place of worship where the golden lampstand, the table of showbread, and altar of incense were.
This door is a picture of Yeshua. Yeshua tells us that He is the Doorway to His Father (John 10:7-9).

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Exodus Chapter 25

Elohim is not going to restrict His presence to this one structure, but He would dwell there. His dwelling place would specifically be between the cherubim on the mercy seat (2 Sam. 6:2). The Mercy Seat is the lid to the Ark of the Covenant.

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Exodus Chapter 24

They did not look upon Him, but saw a vision of Him. Therefore, there is no description given of Him. They only described what was beneath Him as being a pavement of Sapphire.
Elohim did not stretch His Hand out against them, for it would have meant certain death. Instead He allowed them to stay and eat and drink. A feast is the way a covenant is often sealed (Gen. 26: 28-30, 31:52-54).
Yeshua gave the New Covenant at His last Passover Feast (Matt. 26:26-28). We know that the New Covenant will not be totally consummated until He returns. At that time, we will be made whole and will be totally spotless and blameless before Him. Then we will feast with Him again (Matt. 26:29). This will be the Marriage Supper of the Lamb (Rev. 19:7-9). Just like the Mosaic covenant, it will be on the mountain and we will feast with Him.

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Exodus Chapter 23

There are three Feasts that we are commanded to meet in Jerusalem to appear before Yahweh. The Feast of Unleavened Bread, the Feast of Weeks, and the Feast of Booths.
Paul told us to celebrate the Feast of Unleavened bread decades after the death, resurrection, and ascension of Messiah (1 Cor. 5:7-8).

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Exodus Chapter 21

A father from a poor family might sell his daughter to a well-to-do family in order to secure a future for her. The sale presupposes marriage to the master or his son. The Torah states that she must be treated as a “daughter” or as a free woman.
A female cannot be sold into slavery for sex in any way. She can only be sold as a future wife for the master or his son.

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Exodus Chapter 20

When we are delivered out of the slavery of sin, we are no longer to to act as if we are still in that bondage. We are to walk according to Torah in the newness of life.

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Exodus Chapter 19

Exo 19:8: The elders of the people agreed to abide by all that Elohim had spoken. This is the Covenant itself. It is the agreement by the people to do all the Instructions of Elohim. The covenant is not the Torah itself.
The people did the right thing by agreeing to the Covenant. This fact is demonstrated when Elohim commended their response (Deut. 5:27-28). The next verse tells us what their problem actually was. It wasn’t that they didn’t mean what they said. The problem is that their hearts did not fear Elohim (Deut. 5:29)

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Exodus Chapter 18

Exo 18:23: In Acts 6:1-6, the Apostles have issues in the assembly (ekklesia) that needed attention, but the Apostles did not have the time to deal with them. So they used the model described here in Torah as a solution. They appointed men to handle the smaller matters so the Apostles could deal with their duties to Elohim.

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Exodus Chapter 16

Exo 16:10: The glory of Elohim appeared in a cloud. This was probably a luminous presence within the cloud. This presence of Elohim was to affirm the words of Moses and Aaron to the people.
This is the same way that Elohim appeared at the transfiguration of Yeshua (Matt. 17:5).

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Exodus Chapter 15

This is what is called “The Song of Moses.” It is a poetic restatement of the narrative of redemption in chapter 14. Moses feels the greatness of Elohim’s salvation and expresses it verbally. This same song is sung when Yeshua returns also (Rev. 15:1-5).

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Exodus Chapter 14

Israel was leaving and they were on their way out of Egypt. Elohim told them to turn around. They were to camp at Pi-hahiroth. The precise location of this place is not known. They are to camp opposite of Baal-zephon, by the sea. This place is apparently connected to worship of the sun-god Baal. A Phoenician letter from the sixth century B.C. seems to identify this area to be approximately 27 miles south-Southwest of Port Said. It does seem strange that Elohim told them to go back after He told them to hurry and leave. But the purpose is to lure Pharaoh to go after Israel. Elohim wanted Pharaoh to think Israel was wandering aimlessly in the dessert. It would appear to Pharaoh that they do not know where they are going.

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Exodus Chapter 13

The firstborn of the people were to be sanctified to Elohim. The firstborn of Egypt, both man and beast were killed that night (Ex. 12:12). With that being the case, the firstborn of Israel belonged to Elohim in a special way. The word qadash is translated “sanctify.” It means to consecrate, separate, or set-apart a person or thing from all common or secular purposes for use for service to Elohim.

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Exodus Chapter 12

This is the beginning of the Hebrew calendar as far as we know for certain. But it probably existed from the very beginning. The first month is given the name Abib (Ex. 13:4), which means “spring” or “a young ear of grain.” It overlaps with the modern months of March and April. Most of the months in Scripture did not have names. They are only numbered except for the first one. This changes after they leave Babylon. They adopted the names of the months from the Babylonians who named the months after their gods.

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Exodus Chapter 11

This is the beginning of the Hebrew calendar as far as we know for certain. But it probably existed from the very beginning. The first month is given the name Abib (Ex. 13:4), which means “spring” or “a young ear of grain.” It overlaps with the modern months of March and April. Most of the months in Scripture did not have names. They are only numbered except for the first one. This changes after they leave Babylon. They adopted the names of the months from the Babylonians who named the months after their gods.

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